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The Growth of Today’s Most Massive Galaxies over the last 12.8 Gyr of Cosmic History
March 6, 201711:30 am – 12:30 pm (CDT)

The Growth of Today’s Most Massive Galaxies over the last 12.8 Gyr of Cosmic History

Speaker:

Danilo Marchesini (Tufts University)

Location:

Address:

Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics & Astronomy

College Station, Texas 77843

Event Details

I will present recent findings on the evolution of the properties of the progenitors of local ultra-massive galaxies over the past 11.2 billion years (i.e., since redshift z=3), along with recent results on their environment out to z=2 and of the relative role played by merging and in-situ star formation in the growth of their stellar mass content in the last 10 billion years. I will present the most recent and comprehensive census of quiescent, unobscured and dusty star-forming galaxies as a function of stellar mass since z=3. I will then show very exciting results from a spectroscopic followup programs of candidates of very massive galaxies at 1.5<z<4, along with the latest constraints on the abundance of very massive galaxies in the early universe, as the frontier is pushed into the first 1.5 Gyr of cosmic history (i.e., z>4). I will conclude by giving a preview of latest on-going observational efforts (e.g., HFFDeepSpace, NMBS-II, and others).

Video Recording

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