Department of Physics & Astronomy

Home    /    News

News

A team of astronomers including four from Texas A&M University has discovered that the universe is expanding 5 to 9 percent faster than expected, based on observations with the Hubble Space Telescope.

Continue Reading


Known for his pioneering work with proton-antiproton colliding beams, Peter McIntyre uses his research agenda to develop new technologies for the world\'s strongest magnetic fields for future accelerators. Among other breakthroughs thus far in his nearly four-decade career, he has invented a way to produce electric power from nuclear fission in a reactor that is intrinsically stable, cannot melt down, eats its own waste, does not produce bomb-capable isotopes and uses a fuel that is 10 times more plentiful than uranium.

Continue Reading


California Institute of Technology physicist Barry C. Barish, former director of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) and creator of the LIGO Scientific Collaboration (LSC) that includes more than 1,000 collaborators worldwide, will visit Texas A&M University next week to deliver a free public lecture detailing his role in the groundbreaking experiment recognized earlier this month with the prestigious $3 million Special Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics.

Continue Reading


Established in 2004, the awards recognize outstanding individuals who exemplify the qualities and practices of exceptional academic advising and service to students. Kessler and her fellow recipients each will be recognized with a $2,000 award and a plaque, to be presented at the University Advisors and Counselors Awards Breakfast, set for Tuesday, May 3.

Continue Reading


For the past two years, CDF co-spokesperson David Toback has been spurring on CDF scientists to publish their findings in an effort to uncover new physics or yield more precise measurements using data from Tevatron collisions. His drive and dedication to CDF recently earned Toback a second term as its co-spokesperson

Continue Reading


Texas ties forged seven years ago during the International Year of Astronomy have taken two Lone Star State astronomers global in a quest for a new Argentina-based telescope to aid in the hunt for LIGO-based evidence beyond gravitational waves -- specifically, that of neutron star mergers.

Continue Reading


Ting Li '16, a graduate student in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Texas A&M University, has been selected as the 2016 recipient of the Lederman Fellowship in Experimental Physics, one of the most distinguished postdoctoral fellowships in experimental particle physics.

Continue Reading


Ting Li '16, a graduate student in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Texas A&M University, has been selected as the 2016 recipient of the Lederman Fellowship in Experimental Physics....

Continue Reading


Professors in Texas A&M's Department of Physics and Astronomy explore the night sky for sudden bursts of energy, research that is directly connected to the recent detection of Albert Einstein's gravitational waves.

Continue Reading


The Department of Physics and Astronomy and Department of Aerospace Engineering at Texas A&M University invite audiences across Texas, the nation and even the world to get up-close and personal with science and technology this spring at the 2016 Physics & Engineering Festival...

Continue Reading


When the Brazos Valley Museum of Natural History kicks off its most recent exhibition, Capturing Time: The Story of Early Photography on Thursday (Jan. 28), a portion of the spotlight will be shining on astronomy connections, past and present.

Continue Reading


Four Texas A&M University professors have been elected as 2015 Fellows of the American Physical Society (APS), the world's largest organization of physicists...

Continue Reading


Marlan O. Scully, distinguished professor of physics and astronomy at Texas A&M University, has been selected as a 2015 Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors...

Continue Reading


The Large Underground Xenon (LUX) dark matter experiment has already proven itself to be the most sensitive detector in the hunt for dark matter, the mysterious and unseen force believed to account for nearly three-fourths of the matter in the universe.

Continue Reading


The Large Underground Xenon (LUX) dark matter experiment, operating nearly a mile underground at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in the Black Hills of South Dakota and involving roughly 100 international scientists -- including Texas A&M University physicist Robert C. Webb -- has already proven itself to be the most sensitive detector in the hunt for dark matter...

Continue Reading


First     Previous     1   2   3   4   5   6       Next    Last    

Home    /    News